Publication.

International Team of Researchers Uses the Large Millimeter Telescope to Observe a Powerful Molecular Wind in an Active Spiral Galaxy.

An international team of astrophysicists using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) in central Mexico has detected an unexpected and powerful outflow of molecular gas in a distant active galaxy similar to the Milky Way. The galaxy is 800 million light years from Earth. The findings are published in the current edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters, link to article. The research team includes Min S. Yun, a professor of astronomy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and colleagues from Mexico’s Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE), the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) and institutions in Italy, Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, Germany and Spain.

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Photo Release.

Messier 106, a spiral galaxy with a secret.

A new composite of NGC 4258 features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red). NGC 4258 is well known to astronomers for having "anomalous" arms that are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but rather intersect with it. Researchers are trying to understand how the giant black hole in the center of NGC 4258 is affecting the rest of the galaxy. NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is located about 23 million light years from Earth. Credit X-ray: NASA/CXC/Caltech/P.Ogle et al; Optical: NASA/STScI & R.Gendler; IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA