Photo Release.

Messier 106, a spiral galaxy with a secret.

A new composite of NGC 4258 features X-rays from Chandra (blue), radio waves from the VLA (purple), optical data from Hubble (yellow and blue), and infrared with Spitzer (red). NGC 4258 is well known to astronomers for having "anomalous" arms that are not aligned with the plane of the galaxy, but rather intersect with it. Researchers are trying to understand how the giant black hole in the center of NGC 4258 is affecting the rest of the galaxy. NGC 4258, also known as Messier 106, is located about 23 million light years from Earth. Credit X-ray: NASA/CXC/Caltech/P.Ogle et al; Optical: NASA/STScI & R.Gendler; IR: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Radio: NSF/NRAO/VLA

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Photo Release.

Revisiting an icon.

The Pillars of Creation — visible and infrared comparison. This image compares two new views of the Eagle Nebula’s Pillars of Creation captured by Hubble. On the left the pillars are seen in visible light, capturing the multi-coloured glow of gas clouds, wispy tendrils of dark cosmic dust, and the rust-coloured elephants’ trunks of the nebula’s famous pillars. The right image is taken in infrared light, which penetrates much of the obscuring dust and gas and unveils a more unfamiliar view of the pillars. Credit: NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team.